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homework, ask these questions of yourself and then demand answers from washington, because america is at stake. we're not talking about my america or my vision of america. it's your vision of america. what do you think america should look like? and by the way, questioning your government is not only important, but in a democratic republic, it is required of each of us, so, if you're somebody who watches television, scratch your head and say, that doesn't make any sense. this week, i ask you, sit down. write some notes. call a friend right now and say watch the program on fox right now. then, stand up and come follow me. hello, america. this week i'm doing a special series of shows. it's called "a new republic: america's future," but i don't know about you. maybe i'm the only one. i didn't have a problem with the old republic. this special is more aptly titled "reasonable questions for an unreasonable time." all these weeks we will cover these topics, president obama, but you will quickly see this isn't about president obama. it is so much more. we're going to talk about the left an
just did a dvd called rediscovering god in america which includes a section on washington. and i'm very intrigued with the extraordinary job that mount vernon has done in blding a remarkable education center, which i encourage everyone who comes to washington to go see. i would be very tempted someday to write aovel aut washington personally. i think washington's life is so amazing. he is such a personal odyssey in the development of freedom and he's so little understood, but it would be very daunting because washington is maybe the most complex american. i'd be pretty intimidated right now to try to explain his mind and explain how he operated. >> host: we have about 5 minutes left in our first hour of three with author, writer newt gingrich and also former speaker of the house and historian. we're spending three hours talking about his 14 books over his ceer so far. the next telephone call is from jacksonville, florida. you're on the air. >> caller: hello and thank you r c-span and congratulations to brian lamb on his presidential medal of freedom. mr. gingrich, you spoke earlier abou
, america. community organizing is all fun and games until someone starts organizing the community against the community organized government-run healthcare. then, it's time to start breaking some legs, you know what i'm saying? here is the one thing tonight. while the seiu dons their healthcare t-shirts, the tensions keep getting worse and the president is not saying much helpful. how about throwing us a bone here, mr. president? how about a little, hey, you know what? you guys should knock it off. i mean, if he was a parent -- i mean, aren't we going to for the nanny staith here? shouldn't the parent say something like, hey, you knock it off, and you, too! be nice or no healthcare for either of you. i'm just saying it might help kwell "it's just a g.o.p. astro astroturf mob kind of thing." oh, he is not saying anything because this is just pretend grassroots people saying something about pretend healthcare. they are not credible like those of us at seiu, you know, regular people that are in the neighborhoods. the other side would never think about running ads on craigslist to buy support
of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
. the book is called the last best hope restoring conservatism and america's promise. i am pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> sorry you had to bring me. >> i enjoy hearing the stories about the ball girl last time here. (laughter) >> rose: how are you different today? >> you know, i think -- i think i know now in 2009 what i didn't know in 1995. >> rose: i hope so. >> and ironically, i'm counselling my liberal democratic friends, saying just relax. you know, i thought 1995 when we conservatives took over congress, we owned the world. that we could pass whatever we wanted to pass through the house. the senate would confirm it. it would go to the white house, be signed and it would be law. and what i found out was james madison was a pretty smart guy. we darted further right than america was ready to go. and you had moderate republicans and democrats in the senate. it sort of chiseled off the edges of that agenda. the same thing's happening now. and democrats have gone too far left. they spent too much money. they're moving faster than the middle of american political though
sean: tonight, bill clinton, and two hostages released from north korea. but what did america gives up? >> the most effective means of protecting american safety. sean: eric holder. $9 million in the lawyer's fees. that is a whole lot in ethics violations. >> i formally announce my candidacy for the united states presidency. sean: an investigation into the latest golden boy of the political machine. frank luntz, and much much more. "hannity" starts right now. and this is a fox news alert. the two journalists detained in north korea have been released. laura ling and euna lee were released by north korean dictator kim jong il. the pardon was announced just hours after former president bill clinton arrived in p'yongyang. the journalists are both employees of the cable television station current, which is owned by former vice president al gore, and they were charged with illegally entering north korea and sentenced to 12 years of hard labor for their crime, but now, the ordeal is over, and the journalists are on routed back to the u.s. aboard president clinton's airplane. -- they are e
, in solidarity with his hometown. >> i believe it would have an enormous impact upon america. in other words, you are telling the taxpayer that everybody is suffering and you're suffering. >> reporter: chicago's not the only american city that's forcing furlough days upon its workers. in fact, some local and state governments are incorporating them on a regular basis, desperate to cut budgets anywhere they can. michigan wants to save nearly $22 million through six unpaid days. in colorado, furlough days may be accompanied by pay cuts as well. but nothing compares to california, where more than 90% of state workers will be off on the first and third friday of each month until june of 2010. >> it's a much better alternative than people being laid off. >> reporter: despite the sacrifices by city workers, chicago will still be $300 million short of what it needs to fund next year's budget. diana alvear, abc news, chicago. >>> today, an american man who was in prison in one of the most reclusive and repressive countries on earth was set free after a visiting u.s. senator won his release. this man's fr
for growth and prosperity in the long run. these are the jobs futuring of america, renovating schools and hospitals. the elkhart area has seen the benefits. dozens were employed to resurface the runway at elkhart airport. a four mile stretch of highway is being upgrade order u.s. 33. the health center has received recovery dollars to expand services and hire additional staff. and as part of the recovery plan, we're making an historic amendment to innovation. building a new smart grid that carries electricity from coast to coast, laying down broad band lines and high speed rail lines, and providing the largest boost in basic research in history to ensure that american leads in the break through discoveries of the new century. just as we led in the last. because that's what we do best in america. we turn ideas ainto inventions. history should be our guide. the united states led the world economies in the 20th century because we led the world in innovation. today the competition is keen, the challenge is tougher and that's why innovation is more important than ever. that's the key to goo
couldn't even vote for a senator if you were an ordinary citizen. so, the struggle foremocracy in america is ongoing. i think theresa is onto something very important. i'm not sure ralph nader is necessarily the best witness for the prosecution, precisely because he did such a brilliant and important job of holding regulatory agencies to account. when he was the g who was a national figure, fighting for those issues. and now that he is -- made himself a presidential candidate he has become unfortunately very in effect tulle in the most important work he has done. t, the -- absolutely, absolutely we need more democracy in america and won't get it until there is serious popular will for that. >> if youook closely at the 1968 election, george wallace got 13.5% of the vote, it was i a good thing for democracy. >> this is an excellent question and when i look ba, third parties in america, most frequently in our century, have been basically formed by southerners, hoping to hold the balance of power in the electoral college co they could basically broker who the president wouldet to be and were
're praying for you. hello, america. i've been watching the media watch the media watch the town hall protests. do you remember the initial reaction? i believe it was astroturf. these are fake grassroots. these people aren't even real. senator barbara boxer. i like to call her babbs, says the last time she saw such nicely-dressed fake protests protests -- i don't even know what that means -- was in 2000 in florida with al gore, which, by the way i lived in florida. maybe i was responsible for that, too. that wasn't fake anger that. was real anger. fast forward to today, the fake grassroots is obviously not fake, so now that the poll numbers are going in the wrong direction and more people are getting sympathy for the people who attend these town hall meetings, the media has bailed on that fake strategy, and now have changed their opinion from this is fake anger to, man, these people are so angry they're dangerous. they don't have a gun. oh, if people have guns, we should remove all the guns. here is the one thing tonight. the radicals of the left, many of whom now work or meet at the white hou
? or is it getting stuck in the bureaucratic mud? >>> one country's trash is another country's poison. america's discarded electronics are endangering the lives of these kids half a world away. and ron claiborne travels to africa on the trail of e-waste. >>> and money rehab. one woman, 300 pairs of jeans, 160 pairs of shoes. and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders go to turn their lives around. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. >> good morning, i'm just sending a tweet out. >> are you tweeting? >> right now! it is sunday, august 2nd. twitter's everywhere. it's everywhere. >> i thought we banned it from the set? >> no, i just sent your picture out. check it out, folks. 140 characters can it really get you into trouble? a lot of times we don't even think before we tweet but you really should because what you tweet could land you in court. one woman who slammed her landlord on twitter found out the hard way and she's being sued for defamation. we're going to get into this whole legal issu
and america'sha amased to have m back at this tle. welce. >> sorry you had to bring e. >> i joy hearing the stories out the ball gi la time here. (laughter) >> rose: w are you differt today? >> you kw, i think -- i think i know now in 2009 what i dn't know in 1995. > rose: i hope so. >> and ironically, i'm counselling my liberal democratic friends, sang just relax. you know, ihought 1995 en we conservatives took over coness, we owned the world. that w could pass atever we wanteto pass through the house. the senate would confirm it. it would go tohe white house, be signednd it would be l. and what i found out was james mason was a pret smart guy. we darted further right than amica was ready to go. and you ha moderat republicans and democts in the senate. it sort ofhiseled off the edges of tt agenda. the same thing's happening now. and docrats have goneoo far left. thespent too much money. they're movi faster th the middlef american political thought is ready to go. and there learning th same lesson. >>ose: are they doing that because it is their ideaologic place or are they doi that beca
america less safe? >> jaycee dugard was found alive -- excuse me -- wasç found lyig in antioch.c@ laura: every parent's nightmare, a kidnapped child. caution,çç you are about to er the no spin zone. ççhi, everyone. i am laura ingraham, reporting tonight for bill o'reilly. now, right to our top story tonight. is the mainstream mediaç trying to use violent it's a critic? some say that is the motivation for -- is the mainstream media trying to silence a critic? >>ç how can theç obama plan cr 50 million patients without any new doctors? it cannot. it will hurt our seniors and medicare as we know it, ration care, ça limited life-çsaving madison -- ration care, limit edicine. laura: abc says that the spot departed and position on a controversial issue,çç which violates its longstanding policy -- says the spot takes a position on controversial issues which violates its longstanding policy. ççalso, some straight talk frm democrats, admitting it is too tough to take on some special interests in the health-care bill, like the trial lawyers. here is what dr/çç howard d
best hope storing conservatism a america promise. am pleased to have him back at th table. lcome. >> sry you had to bring m >> i eny hearing the stories abt the ball girl lastime here. (laughter) >> rose: hoare you differentoday? >> you kno ihink -- i think i know now in 2009 what i did't know in 1995. >rose: i hope so. >> and ironically,'m counselling my liberal democratic friends, sayi just relax. you know, i tought 1995 wh we conservatives took over congrs, we owned the world. that we could pass whever we wanted pass through the house. he senate would confirm it. it would go to t white ouse, be signed ad it would be law and what iound out was james madion was a pretty smart guy. we darted further right than amera was ready to go. and you had moderate republicans and democra in the senate. it sort of cseled off the edges of tha agenda. the same thing'sappening now. and demrats have gone t far left. they ent too much money. they're movingaster than the middle omerican litical thought is ready to go. and they' learning the same lesson. >> re: are they doing that because it is th
to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >>> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> the quest for peace in the middle east has been going on for generations now, and it never seems to get much easier. we got that impression again today after another apparently inconclusive meeting in london between israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell. the two men and the two nations they reprent have been searching for months now for a way to resolve their differences over israeli settlements in the west bank. the u.s. has been pushing hard for an israeli settlement freeze, and the palestinians are refusing to restart peace talks until israel halts all construction there. despite their failure to reach agreement again today, the two sides will resume talks in washington next week. both men tried to put the best face on today's talks. >> we' headway in the past five months. my government has taken several steps both of word and deed to advance course of peace. and i hope that today and in the coming week
northern virginia here on c-span. >> good morning. i am an intern scholar here at the young america foundation, a leading organization on college campuses. if you would like to take advantage of the resources or campus activism, such as booking speakers were getting materials for events, please contact us by phone or online at our website, www.yaf.org. our next speaker is president of the washington d.c.-based research council which leads the way in defending the judeo- christian values upon which our nation was built. he served in the louisiana state legislature as recognized as a pioneer by offering many measures. he hosts a national radio program called "washington watched weekly." his first book was released just last year. copies will be available of this book for purchase and signing after his talk. a veteran of the u.s. marine corps and a former police officer and tv news reporter, he brings a unique blend of experience and leadership to the pro-family movement. please welcome mr. tony perkins. [applause] >> good morning. it is good to see a friendly crowd here in d.c. for
. for america, he was the defender of a dream. >> ted kennedy was in fact the last surviving son of a political legacy, a legend in american politics. and a man some call one of the great senators of our time. good evening. i'm jim vance. >> i'm windy rieger in for doreen. the nation mourns the death of senator kennedy. michelle franzen starts us off. >> reporter: a lone spotlight illuminated by a hazard ship in hyannisport, a beacon of hope off the shore of the kennedy family compound. inside family and friends including senator john kerry gather to mourn and reflect on the great life lost. >> there is a very beautiful and personal, private, vigil taking place. it's very spiritual and -- about as -- beautiful as it could be. i think it is everything that senator ken tnedy would have wanted. private and public tributes. kennedy would have loved. [ "taps" plays ] at at fenway park, taps played in his honor. and flags flew at half staff, near his home to capitol hill. >> the liberal lion's mighty roar. i'll always remember. may now fall silent. his dreams shall never die. >> those who knew kenned
celebrities as he could to walk in the parades and attract recruit. the best known black man in america was jack johnson. he asked to join the service but he was an exile in paris and they wouldn't waive -- they did name a show after him. jack johnson was the biggest show the u.s. had. this is james reese, one of the best known men in harlem. the ahead of the music union. they wanted to hire musicians for society ball, they called him. some nights he would drive around harlem directing bands five or six different places. he would recruit from the streets of harlem. also the conductor of choice for a dance duo, vernon and irene castle. vernon castle was british citizen. and james muir traveled with them and got famous because of them. vernon castle joined the raf. they served in the 7th and 131st and the recruiting office was around the corner the cigar store. this is the tree of hope people touched for good luck, and they marched around with broomsticks on their shoulders instead of rifles. hayward used his wealthy friends to buy uniforms. they were porters and elevator operators and ar
.p. morgan doing 20% of their mortgages. down towards the bottom, you have bank of america and wells fargo at 4% and 6%. host: let's put the basics backs on the table. it is called what? guest: under the umbrella of making home affordable, at the peace we are focusing on is the home affordable modification program. it is what buyers do if they are running into problems. they call their letter and say they want a hempo modifications . the servicer will figure out how much you can pay. the point is to get your monthly payments down to 31% of your income. host: how much money was set aside for this and how was it used? guest: they set aside a certain amount. there are several pieces to this. there is an incentive payment for each loan that gets modified that is successful. then there are annual payments of $1,000 as long as the lone state's current. the bar were actually gets money towards their payments going to pay down their principal. -- the bowerer actually gets money towards their payments. the servicer will reduce their payment to 38% and the government will split the difference with t
making america less safe? >> jaycee dugard was found alive -- excuse me -- wasç found lyig in antioch.c@ laura: every parent's nightmare, a kidnapped child. caution,çç you are about to er the no spin zone. ççhi, everyone. i am laura ingraham, reporting tonight for bill o'reilly. now, right to our top story tonight. is the mainstream mediaç trying to use violent it's a critic? some say that is the motivation for -- is the mainstream media trying to silence a critic? >>ç how can theç obama plan cr 50 million patients without any new doctors? it cannot. it will hurt our seniors and medicare as we know it, ration care, ça limited life-çsaving madison -- ration care, limit edicine. laura: abc says that the spot departed and position on a controversial issue,çç which violates its longstanding policy -- says the spot takes a position on controversial issues which violates its longstanding policy. ççalso, some straight talk frm democrats, admitting it is too tough to take on some special interests in the health-care bill, like the trial lawyers. here is what dr/çç
as much to me as the chance toward america's highest civilian medal to these recipients here today. this is a chance for me and for the united states of america to say thank-you to some of the finest citizens of this country and all countries. the men and women honored today have led very different lives, receiving many different degrees. they are pioneers in science and medicine. they have made their mark in the courtroom, the community, and in congress. what unites them is a belief that most, forgive me for those who are not americans, but for what we believe to be those most american of the leaves. that our lives are what we make of them. no barriers of race, gender, or physical infirmity constrain the spirit. -- can constrain the spirit. the recipients of the medal of freedom did not set out to win this, or any other award. they did not set out in pursuit of glory or fame or riches, they set out guided by passion and hard work, aided by persistence, often with few advantages but the gifts, grace, and a good name given to them by god. let them stand as an example here in the uni
need health care in america. one of the people who really got the people have asked me, what was it like? i tell people that barack obama, the most thing that i will say is driving him is that he watched his white mother died because of inefficiency in health care in america. i think that is the number one driving force, that he does not want to see that happen to americans, white and black, across the board. and he is going to fight with everything he has got because he watched it. he does not have his mother anymore, he does not have his father anymore, and i think he wants people like me who get laid off, 10,000 of us, and know that we need health care in america. thank god for people like sharon brower, the senator who is working hard -- like sherrod brown, the senator who is working hard on behalf of the american people. i worked 45 years of my life and got laid off. people have no idea what it is like to be laid off in america if you have never been laid off. we need this, and i thank god for barack obama, sherrod brown, in the people who are fighting for our rights to
yesterday with apologies to those folks watching on c-span, but the only moral contented people in america then left-wing commager's on blogs or left wing collars -- are left wing coallers on washington journal. three weeks ago, nancy pelosi was blocking legislation would prohibit the fairness doctrine. who is the lead role in the senate, not barbara boxer, the other one feinstein did mention it. they're blocking republican attempts to shut it down while pointing people t the fcc to throw it back in. we have to be vigilant >> thank you, i live in a snake pit called new jersey have the time. part of the problem is that in new jersey, we have three republican congressmen that voted for capt. trade. i, being a lifelong republican and conservative feel like it is time to pull the plug on these people. [applause] if they're going to be supporting barack obama and the democrats, we do not need them. but when i talk to other republican people, they say that if we get rid of one, we will get another one so that i am in a dilemma about that. we have a man that is running for governor who, one week
is now president of the united states of america. [applause] our senators taking over from republicans. [applause] our good friend donna edwards has banned elected to her first full term in the house of representatives with many, many more to come. [applause] i have to tell you as someone who works with netroots nation every year, we had to be ready for the alternative. we had to have our other agenda in place in case the other actions turned out otherwise. some of the panel's we had in place. "no, we didn't." food policy and the mccain era. advocating the canadian immigration process. [laughter] taking your message to the people, billboards and skywriting changed elections. rob emanuel. meet the supreme court's first supreme court justice, alberto gonzales. reforming the vice-presidential selection process, how to find the village with the biggest idiot. [laughter] [applause] on behalf of our board, i can't say enough about our tremendous staff that works year-round to put this conference together. raven brooks, karen colbern, we would not be here without you. [applause] we would not
home training. immigration reform? this question came via e-mail at america's voice. during 2008, latino voters played and historic role turning four stage from red to blue. it's a defining issue for latino voters and president obama campaigned on a promise for this. how is he going to get comprehensive immigration reform done now. we've seen the dates flip a bit. what's doing on? >> what the president said throughout the campaign and in office is we have to have comprehensive immigration reform. my top person who is head of international governmental affairs, the question she asked before joining the administration is, is the president committed this and he absolutely is and he's pulled together members of congress, those who are supported of immigration reform and those who are not, brought them together in the white house and began to dialogue. we have someone working hard on the hill to see what measures we can do in the short-term but the real solution is long-term immigration reform. you mentioned the date has slipped. obviously there's a full plate but i think the preside
>>> good morning, america. breaking news. two firefighters die as they try to travel through massive wildfires in california. nearly 50,000 acres ablaze. 12,000 homes threatened. >>> our house is gone. >> are you serious? >> i'm standing right there. >> sam champion reports live on the scene. >>> house of horror. new details from inside the compound where jaycee dugard was held for 18 years. her stepfather here with us live, the latest on jaycee and her daughters. and with the two woman who helped crack the case through their mother's intuition. >>> high alert. what west point cadets are teaching all of us about avoiding swine flu. ♪ >>> why a song has sometimes what the doctor ordered. dr. mehmet oz on how to gain more sleep and gain more energy without pills. >>> we say good morning, america. closing out august, the 31st, 2009. so great to have you back. >> my time away was restful and productive. got much needed rest and on the road on assignment and share those stories in the near future. so much news. we'll begin with a half a dozen fires burning across california, the
looked around and i saw america. i saw white people and i saw black people. and i saw men and i saw women and i saw english-speakers and spanish-speakers in our caucus. our diversity is our strength. and when you have a diverse group the way you create solidarity is through shared values. the kind of discussion we have when a vote comes up that seems like a tough vote for me because the way my district is or because i just have problems with them on the basis of conscience, the discussion is always on the level of what's right, what's good, what's right, never, what's in it for me, what's in it for the leadership? it never takes that kind of turn. and the democrats don't vote as a single bloc and some close and some unpredictable. we had a couple that took a long time to vote. but the net result of that is that through our diversity, we have our strength. now, you compare that to the other side which seems to operate on completely different principles. doesn't have anything even remotely resembling diversity in our caucus and it seems to fight the very idea of diversity. i remember one si
were closing their doors. this has been a lifeline for the automobile manufacturers around america. it is probably the one stimulus part that has worked very well, very seamlessly. i think the house of representatives agreed with that. they put another $2 billion of money into the program with over 300 votes. this is not insignificant. it was done in a short time. the people's representatives get it because the people get that. this is a wildly popular program. people loved to buy cars. the american government -- our government is not buying cars for people. we are providing an incentive to go to dealerships in trade in a card that gives a very high gas mileage for a card that gives lower gas mileage. when-wind. we are taking carbon dioxide out of the environment. we are taking these automobiles off the road -- a win-win for everyone. >> you have gone to $1 billion and another $2 billion allocated by the house. if that run stride -- >> we believe that $2 billion that we are hopeful that the house will pass this week that will be signed by the president this week will take us throug
would say donations. >> advertising for products. >> public money, i am short. >> by taxes? >> america's cable companies created c-span is a public service, a private business initiative -- note government mandate, no government money. >> the department has begun sending out the first tuition payments to universities but dissipating indeed post 9/11 g.i. bill -- participating in the post 9/11 g.i. bill program. more on that from jim webb, a co-sponsor the bill. we'll also hear from eric shinseki and president obama. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is an honored have you with us today and is an honor for us to host this important celebration. earlier this year, george mason was privileged to be one of the many colleges and universities across the nations to commit itself to the yellow ribbon enhancement program. a provision of the post 9/11 g.i. bill of 2008, this initiative is designed to extend higher education funding for servicemen and women who served after the september 11, 2001 attacks. i know that members of that day still remain in all of our hearts. shock, horror, a tragedy. f
been a place of retreat and renewal for america's greatest political dynasty. now they remember a patriarch, and this town remembers a friend. sam barber sold him paintings. >> i'm going to miss him terribly. i'm speechless. >> reporter: ted kennedy's father bought a cottage here in 1928, thinking it would be good for the kids' health. three decades later, ted's brothers john and robert purchased surrounding homes, creating this three acre property simply known as the compound. john is the editor of "the last lion." >> for years of his life, this was the home. this was the one home they kept returning to. they lived in new york, massachusetts, london, england, but for john, this was his anchor. >> reporter: the brothers played their famous games of touch football on the lawn here, training for the youngest brother, a star at harvard. >> i think this was the center of his young world. so many things happened here. certainly, in times of tragedy, this is where the kennedys gathered. >> reporter: a place of mourning too many times for the kennedy clan. ted was there in 1999 when he
that has always moved america forward nap means once again having the best educated, highest skilled workforce in the world. that means a health care system that makes it possible for entrepreneurs to innovate and businesses to compete without being saddled with skyrocketing insurance costs. >> reporter: there you have it. essentially what we are likely going to be hearing from president obama in the days and weeks to come. once again, t.j., trying to make his case and make his argument, that health care reform is an issue that cannot wait. that lawmakers have to tackle it sooner rather than later. t.j.? >> yeah, elaine. we know the president's making his kashgs but seems like the other side of the debate, you could almost argue, other democrats in a lot of ways. where do the republicans fit in and what do they have to say? just seems like this debate is going back and forth between democrats an democrats. >> reporter: you're absolutely right. a lot of this, deep divisions with the democratic party over this. conservative blue dog we heard about before, as well as progressive. for th
: and welcome to a very special edition of "hannity's america." -- of "hannity." hello, san diego. the site of our freedom concert and we have a big show in store. colonel oliver north will be here. former ms. california, carrie prejean, will be joined by the great one mark levine and our great american panel. and democrats are continuing their efforts to attack average americans who are speaking pout at town halls all across this country -- speak being out at town halls all across this country. they have been called angry mobs and dismissed as republican operatives. why are the democrats afraid of speech and can the strategy work? i'm joined by -- i call him the great one -- 12 weeks number one on "the new york times" best seller list, 17 weeks overall, liberty and tyranny, a conservative manifesto. great one, the great one. by the way, do you have a mob name? >> a mob name? i'm the shark. sean: you're the shark. he's the shark. are you all mobsters here? an angry mob. >> wait a minute. how many of you are insurance executives? raise your hand? how many of you here are -- what, car executi
paper on the history of riots in america. my community had been torn up by riots in the aftermath of the killing of dr. martin luther king. she said fine, write about riots in america. for the first time in my life, i actually got turned on by english. i researched riots from the 1920's, overseas, and spent hours in the library. i came back and wrote a 140 page manuscript, as i recall. mrs. klinger took this manuscript home. she was a diminutive whiteshe took it home and came back after the weekend and calls me up and says ellis, i will tell you what. i will give you an "a" in this course. i am really not capable of judging this material. you need to send this to a professional. i paused and said, a professional what? i dunno and professionals. -- i do not know any professionals. >> she said, have you ever heard a woman called gwendolyn brooks? send it to her. see what she thinks. we got an address where she was teaching, and i sent gwendolyn brooks this manuscript on riots throughout history. i did not hear anything for weeks, and one saturday i got a call. it was gwendolyn brook
is being overshadowed about concern about the u.s.' america. tokyo's nikkei average tumbled 3% today. hong kong's hang seng is down sharply. in london the ftse opened lower. this comes after a down week on wall street last week. the dow fell 48 points and starts the week at 9,321. the nasdaq dropped 14 points to close at 1985. >>> general motors is looking to capitalize on the growing market for ultra low cost car in developing markets. "the wall street journal" is reporting that gm is planning to build a car that will sell for around $4,000. gm is looking to make up for declining sales in the u.s. the first car chrysler produces with new partner fiat may not be made in the usa. chrysler will build the fiat 500 in mexico. that could lead to a backlash among u.s. taxpayers who helped save the automaker but chrysler is said to be building the engines in michigan. >>> a new promotion to build up sales. ihop is offering free kids' meals seven nights a week for the next month with the purchase of an adult meal. according to "usa today" several smaller chains have been offering similar deals. >>
demand from america's consumers. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning. and thanks for being with us.we violent weather, which has ravished parts of eastern texas. >> it started yesterday afternoon, in the houston area, with heavy rain, strong wind and at least one tornado. >> meanwhile, a construction worker died after rainwater flooded the tunnel he was working in. >> water came in from everywhere. they were saying. and didn't know where it was coming from. had to go in there while they were on air, breathing air. we had to have hoses in there. we didn't know what the atmosphere was. >> two men were able to escape. but a body of a third worker was found about 50 feet inside the tunnel. >>> in nearby beaumont, texas, a tornado struck without warning in a crowded shopping center, sending people running for their lives. the twister touched down outside the kohl's department store, around 2:00 tuesday afternoon, catching shoppers offguard. a worker at a nearby restaurant grabbed his cell phone, capturing this video of the twister's powerful winds. >> it went over towards walmar
pretty much 100% control of all information dissemination in america. now you have these tiny little breaches in the wall of sound with talk radio and the internet so what they want to do? shut them down. >> host: early one morning just been published you were being interviewed by howard smith on pbs and he said you talk about victims and dictum put in america but the more i listen to you i think that you are the one claiming victimhood, that you are the victim of the left-wing conspiracy and he held out his arms and said you should have across. what is howard smith struggling with? [laughter] .. how is chris werner going to get out there and heather macdonald? we have so many fantastic writers in new york, some and fantastic right wing writers and you are buying your head against the wall just to get attention for a book in even a best-selling book, even your seventh best-selling book when it's that hard for me to get on tv what does that say about the conservatives people love norma? >> host: others have said you try to be funny and he called a sophomoric sort of simplistic view of
leading the charge -- the president of the autism society of america. they have been listening to families about these issues and trying to come up with recommendations. i am sure that group would love to have an audience and get some ideas that they have been grappling with. >> you just wrote about standards. someone mentioned that you get all kinds of misinformation. you have been on this telehealth for three years now. when you mention standards, is that what you're talking about? >> absolutely. when we start our treatment program, it is a comprehensive treatment program. unfortunately, families can pop up in the internet search and tiepin -- type in telehealth treatment. i do not see how it is possible to form a true therapeutic bond and go ahead and treat the child. is very disconcerting. you can quarry pretty much anything with autism and related disorders. whether it is some way to repair your car, somebody who can paint your house, it is so sporadic. parents do not have a consistent place to ensure that they're going to receive quality care. i am encouraged that you have folks meet
that today is the day of reckoning ♪ sean: and welcome to a very special edition of "hannity's america." -- of "hannity." hello, san diego. the site of our freedom concert and we have a big show in store. colonel oliver north will be here. former ms. california, carrie prejean, will be joined by the great one mark levine and our great american panel. and democrats are continuing their efforts to attack average americans who are speaking pout at town halls all across this country -- speak being out at town halls all across this country. they have been called angry mobs and dismissed as republican operatives. why are the democrats afraid of speech and can the strategy work? i'm joined by -- i call him the great one -- 12 weeks number one on "the new york times" best seller list, 17 weeks overall, liberty and tyranny, a conservative manifesto. great one, the great one. by the way, do you have a mob name? >> a mob name? i'm the shark. sean: you're the shark. he's the shark. are you all mobsters here? an angry mob. >> wait a minute. how many of you are insurance executives? raise your hand?
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